Oscillons 4, 17, 45, 12, 21, 27 © 1953 Ben F Laposky. Courtesy of Sanford Museum

Oscillons 4, 17, 45, 12, 21, 27 © 1953 Ben F Laposky. Courtesy of Sanford Museum

OSCILLON RESPONSE

 

AVAILABLE VERSIONS: AUDIOVISUAL PERFORMANCE, ALBUM (UPCOMING ON IMPORTANT RECORDS / CASSAUNA)

HD | BW & COLOUR | 35min | 16:9 | STEREO | SCOTLAND | 2015

 

“AN ENTIRELY NEW WORLD OF CONTINUAL FORMAL FLUX...VISCERAL SUBLIMITY” - THE CUSP
“A TEXTURED AMBIENT ELECTRONICA LACED WITH PROCESSED CHORAL VOCALS. A SENSUOUS INTERPRETATION OF LAPOSKY'S IMAGES" - REALTIME ARTS

 

SYNOPSIS

Sound Artist and Filmmaker Mark Lyken interprets the forefather of Electronic Art, Ben F Laposky’s groundbreaking 1950’s “Oscillon” art works in music and film.

Responding to a selection of six strikingly different photographic works capturing complex, rhythmic waveforms, not only are Laposky’s images a visual inspiration for Lyken’s compositions but the original process behind the creation of the artworks has been utilised to generate the short films that accompany the performance.

 

A CRYPTIC COMMISSION FOR SONICA

SUPPORTED BY CRYPTIC, CREATIVE SCOTLAND, PRS FOUNDATION, BRITISH COUNCIL, THE TAIPEI ARTIST VILLAGE, SANFORD MUSEUM, THE OSCILLOSOPE MUSEUM AND IMPORTANT RECORDS - WITH SPECIAL THANKS TO EMMA DOVE, SKOOBY LAPOSKY & VOLKER KLOCKE

 

AUDIOVISUAL PERFORMANCES

2017 Mareel, Shetland, Scotland

2016 DMC - Dumfries Music Convention, The Stove Network, Dumfries, Scotland

2016 Sound Festival, The Lemon Tree, Aberdeen, Scotland

2016 The Spree Festival, Paisley Arts Centre, Paisley, Scotland

2016 EXPO Dome, Taipei Expo Park, Taipei, Taiwan

2016 From Now On Festival, Chapter Arts, Cardiff, Wales

2016 Kings Place, London, England

2015 Premiere, Sonica Festival, Mitchell Theatre, Glasgow, Scotland

 

BEN LAPOSKY

BEN F LAPOSKY (1914 -2000) was an artist and mathematician from Cherokee, Iowa, who from 1950 onward created over 100 oscillogram artworks that he called OSCILLONS. These trace images were generated using a collection of electronic equipment connected together to produce complex rhythmic waveforms that were photographed from the screen of a cathode-rayoscilloscope. His original one-man show of black and white Oscillons, along with 52 additional color images, is curated and controlled by the Sanford Museum and often travels to museums and universities internationally.

 

PERFORMANCE AND PROJECT STILLS